Biology B- Evolution and Ecology a semester-long lab-based course that provides the student with an overview of the cell while building the necessary skills those students need to be successful in science.  It is designed for the student that would benefit from a slower pace than the traditional B level Biology course.  This semester long course includes content from the following areas:  evolution and genetic change, the interaction of humans with their environment and energy of the cell. Students are expected to participate in laboratory experiences, including inquiry-based group activities. Students will be responsible for writing lab reports based on their lab experience

Students are expected to participate in laboratory experiences, including inquiry-based group activities, and prepare lab reports throughout the course.   Homework is assigned on a regular basis.

 

Course Goals:

Students will

-         develop a working understanding of the scientific method and its use in identifying questions, designing controlled experiments, data collection, data analysis and drawing conclusions from collected data.

-         develop and demonstrate scientific skills including the use of  microscopes and other equipment.

-         work in cooperative groups in order to solve problems.

-         demonstrate an understanding of the living world around them and their impact on that world.

-         explore the scientific, technological and ethical aspects of contemporary issues in biology.

I.        Text(s) 

            Miller and Levine.  Biology: the Living Science.  Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, c1998.                   

II.     Supplementary readings 

                        A variety of current newspaper, magazine and journal articles is recommended.

III.   Technology

            Internet, World Wide Web, laser discs and videotapes

                                    Note:  the laser disc Life Sciences, Optical Data Corp., Warren, NJ, c1986,

                                     is available within the Science Department

IV.  Additional resources

                        Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). Biological Science: A Molecular

                                    Approach ( Blue Version).  D. C. Heath, Lexington, MA, c2001.

                        Campbell, Neil A.  Biology.  Benjamin Cummings, San Francisco, CA, c2002.

                        Miller, Kenneth R. and Levine, Joseph.  Biology. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs   NJ, c2000.

 

Biology B- Genetics a semester-long lab-based course that provides the student with an overview of the cell while building the necessary skills that students need to be successful in science.  It is designed for the student that would benefit from a slower pace than the traditional B level Biology course.  This semester course centers on the following content areas:  the structure and function of DNA, Mendelian Genetics, and Biotechnology.  Students are expected to participate in laboratory experiences, including inquiry-based group activities. Students will be responsible for writing lab reports based on their lab experience

Students are expected to participate in laboratory experiences, including inquiry-based group activities, and prepare lab reports throughout the course.   Homework is assigned on a regular basis.

 

Course Goals:

Students will

-         develop a working understanding of the scientific method and its use in identifying questions, designing controlled experiments, data collection, data analysis and drawing conclusions from collected data.

-         develop and demonstrate scientific skills including the use of  microscopes and other equipment.

-         work in cooperative groups in order to solve problems.

-         demonstrate an understanding of the living world around them and their impact on that world.

-         explore the scientific, technological and ethical aspects of contemporary issues in biology.

I.        Text(s) 

            Miller and Levine.  Biology: the Living Science.  Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, c1998.                   

II.     Supplementary readings 

                        A variety of current newspaper, magazine and journal articles is recommended.

III.   Technology

            Internet, World Wide Web, laser discs and videotapes

                                    Note:  the laser disc Life Sciences, Optical Data Corp., Warren, NJ, c1986,

                                     is available within the Science Department

IV.  Additional resources

                        Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). Biological Science: A Molecular

                                    Approach ( Blue Version).  D. C. Heath, Lexington, MA, c2001.

                        Campbell, Neil A.  Biology.  Benjamin Cummings, San Francisco, CA, c2002.

                        Miller, Kenneth R. and Levine, Joseph.  Biology. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs   NJ, c2000.

Anatomy and Physiology:

  Is about how coordinated structures and functions of human organ systems maintain a stable internal environment despite changes in the outside environment.

 

Biology B is a full-year course, required for graduation. It is designed for 10th grade students. B level biology differs from A level in the depth of the subject matter covered, and in the expectations for student work, both in terms of the amount of work required and the sophistication of the work.

 

This course covers nine topics: Scientific Method, Biochemistry, Cells, Cell Energy, DNA, Mendelian Genetics, Cell Division, Evolution, and Ecology.  Additional topics may be selected by individual teachers each year to best meet the needs of each group of students.

 

Students are expected to participate in laboratory experiences, including inquiry-based group activities, and prepare lab reports throughout the course.   Homework is assigned on a regular basis.

 

Course Goals:

Students will

-         develop a working understanding of the scientific method and its use in identifying questions, designing controlled experiments, data collection, data analysis and drawing conclusions from collected data.

-         develop and demonstrate scientific skills including the use of  microscopes and other equipment. 

-         work in cooperative groups in order to solve problems.

-         demonstrate an understanding of the living world around them and their impact on that world.

-         explore the scientific, technological and ethical aspects of contemporary issues in biology.

 

I.        Text(s) 

            Miller and Levine.  Biology: the Living Science.  Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ,  c1998.                               

II.     Supplementary readings 

                        A variety of current newspaper, magazine and journal articles is recommended.

III.   Technology

            Internet, World Wide Web, laser discs and videotapes

                                    Note:  the laser disc Life Sciences, Optical Data Corp., Warren, NJ, c1986,

                                     is available within the Science Department.

IV.  Additional resources

                        Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). Biological Science: A Molecular

                                    Approach ( Blue Version).  D. C. Heath, Lexington, MA, c2001.

                        Campbell, Neil A.  Biology.  Benjamin Cummings, San Francisco, CA, c2002.

                        Miller, Kenneth R. and Levine, Joseph.  Biology. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs   NJ, c2000.

 

Biology B- the Cell is a semester-long lab-based course that provides the student with an overview of the cell while building the necessary skills that students need to be successful in science.  It is designed for the student that would benefit from a slower pace than the traditional B level Biology course.  This semester course centers on four content areas:  the scientific method, the chemistry of life, the cell structure and function, and the process of cell growth and division.  Students are expected to participate in laboratory experiences, including inquiry-based group activities. Students will be responsible for writing lab reports based on their lab experience

 

Students are expected to participate in laboratory experiences, including inquiry-based group activities, and prepare lab reports throughout the course.   Homework is assigned on a regular basis.

 

Course Goals:

Students will

-         develop a working understanding of the scientific method and its use in identifying questions, designing controlled experiments, data collection, data analysis and drawing conclusions from collected data.

-         develop and demonstrate scientific skills including the use of  microscopes and other equipment.

-         work in cooperative groups in order to solve problems.

-         demonstrate an understanding of the living world around them and their impact on that world.

-         explore the scientific, technological and ethical aspects of contemporary issues in biology.

I.        Text(s) 

            Miller and Levine.  Biology: the Living Science.  Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, c1998.                   

II.     Supplementary readings 

                        A variety of current newspaper, magazine and journal articles is recommended.

III.   Technology

            Internet, World Wide Web, laser discs and videotapes

                                    Note:  the laser disc Life Sciences, Optical Data Corp., Warren, NJ, c1986,

                                     is available within the Science Department

IV.  Additional resources

                        Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). Biological Science: A Molecular

                                    Approach ( Blue Version).  D. C. Heath, Lexington, MA, c2001.

                        Campbell, Neil A.  Biology.  Benjamin Cummings, San Francisco, CA, c2002.

                        Miller, Kenneth R. and Levine, Joseph.  Biology. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs   NJ, c2000.